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Tapina
Tech blog entries have now moved to the main Tapina Blog. This article on progressive enhancement with GWT can be found at http://www.tapina.com/blog/gwt-progressive-enhancement-existing-page.html.
 
 
Tapina
09 March 2009 @ 10:21 am
Tech blog entries have now moved to the main Tapina Blog. This article on progressive enhancement with GWT can be found at http://www.tapina.com/blog/substituting-variables-xml-templates.html.
 
 
Tapina
25 February 2009 @ 10:24 am
Tech blog entries have now moved to the main Tapina Blog. This article on progressive enhancement with GWT can be found at http://www.tapina.com/blog/integrating-gwt-with-spring.html.
 
 
Tapina

I had this old page linked (http://homepage.mac.com/rnc/EditMpegHeaderIFO.html) but it appears to have gone.

 

Reproduced below for my (and others’) information.

 

MPEG file

 

Locate the sequence header 00 00 01 b3 (usually hex address 000)

Make changes as need, then save.

 

Here is an example: 740x480, 16:9, 23.976 fps

 

0000000: 00 00 01 B3 2E 01 E0 31 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

 

Horizontal Size in Hex

16 0 = 352

1E 0 = 480

2D 0 = 720

2E 4 = 740

 

Vertical Size in Hex

0F 0 = 240

1E 0 = 480

 

Aspect Ratio

1 = 1:1

2 = 4:3

3 = 16:9

4 = 2.211 (not used in dvd)

 

Frame Rate

1 = 23.976

2 = 24

3 = 25

4 = 29.97

5 = 30

6 = 50

7 = 59.94

8 = 60

 

IFO file

 

Open your VTS_01_0.IFO in HexEditor,

Locate hex address 200

Make changes as need, then save.

 

Here is an example: 16:9, 740x480, AC3 audio

 

0000200: F9 00 00 01 00 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

 

Aspect Ratio

43 = 4:3

F9 = 16:9

 

Resolution NTSC (PAL)

00 = 720x480 (720x576)

1 = 704x480 (704x576)

0A = 352x480 (352x576)

0C = 352x240 (352x288)

 

Audio Coding

00 = AC3

02 = Mpeg-1

03 = Mpeg-2ext

04 = LPCM 

06 = DTS


 
 
Tapina
Tech blog entries have now moved to the main Tapina Blog. This article on progressive enhancement with GWT can be found at http://www.tapina.com/blog/thread-safe-replacement-gethostbyname.html.
 
 
 
Tapina
25 January 2008 @ 04:48 pm
I can’t believe I only just came across the Chicago Manual of Style! The actual manual seems to require subscription, but the Q&A is a great resource (and I do not mean “person”!) even without the manual.
 
 
Tapina
25 January 2008 @ 04:02 pm
When did company or project meetings start being called “town halls”?

Furthermore… why do people who work in offices feel bound to create euphemisms for perfectly workable phrases?
“opportunities”? “resources”? and “going forward”? Argh!
 
 
Tapina
18 January 2008 @ 11:48 am
Tech blog entries have now moved to the main Tapina Blog. This article on progressive enhancement with GWT can be found at http://www.tapina.com/blog/clipboard-file-transfer-protocol.html.
 
 
Tapina
18 December 2007 @ 10:32 am
Tech blog entries have now moved to the main Tapina Blog. This article on progressive enhancement with GWT can be found at http://www.tapina.com/blog/type-conversion-using-java-generics.html.
 
 
Tapina
31 October 2006 @ 02:06 pm
Yes, that subject is grammatically correct. I am referring the long file names in Windows, and whether they are visible or not. Mostly not, as I've found from recent experience with CVS and a Java project with a deep package structure. This leads to "No such file or directory" errors, an inability to manipulate the file with Explorer, and other goodies. Essentially, if you do a bit of Googling for 'windows MAX_PATH' then you'll find out that certain of Windows' file handling APIs are restricted to 255 character paths. This manifests itself in serious problems when trying to use CVSNT or similar utilities with long paths. Apparently, Windows' Unicode APIs don't have this restriction, but it seems that Windows Explorer doesn't even use them because the offending files cannot be manipulated from there - no Rename, no Delete, no nothing. If you try to delete the file in a command prompt window then you get a lovely error saying:
The filename or extension is too long.
As an example of the problem, I have a particular class file which is called:
uk\org\cough\develop\oranges\signed\fishandchipshops\modems\trackmylamps\
  widgetland\command\display\GetAppleAdjustmentPrimaryOrangeRefDataHandle.java
. Obviously I have changed the names to protect the guilty, but the length is right. The source is nicely modular so this sits inside a source folder which is components\actions\fishandchipshops_commandactions\src. This sits inside a folder called MyApp v1.20 which sits inside my Eclipse workspace, which is in C:\Documents and Settings\X123456\workspace. OK, so the total path is pretty huge, but none of these things are unreasonable (except possibly for the package depth, but that's not mine to alter). Trying to cvs update this folder even from lower down the tree gives errors like:
cvs: update (warning): uk\org\cough\develop\oranges\signed\fishandchipshops\
modems\trackmylamps\widgetland\command\display\
GetAppleAdjustmentPrimaryOrangeRefDataHandle.java is lost

cvs: update (warning): uk\org\cough\develop\oranges\signed\fishandchipshops\
modems\trackmylamps\widgetland\command\display\
GetAppleAdjustmentPrimaryOrangeRefDataHandle.java: No such file or directory
If I navigate with Windows Explorer to this file, I can't do anything with it except Open or Edit it. There are two workarounds:
  1. Use tools that use the Windows Unicode APIs exclusively. This is difficult, because the Windows GUI itself doesn't.
  2. Use SUBST. SUBST lets you map a drive letter to path. By cutting out the path to my workspace directory, I could save myself 40 characters and make this all work (until someone creates an even deeper, even longer-named source file):
    SUBST P: C:\Documents and Settings\X123456\workspace
    Once this is done, do your CVS commands from the P: drive instead of the C: drive and the path is short enough. Hoorah!